Somebody else's babies

History tells us that heinous, unthinkable acts were routinely carried out on somebody else's babies.  

After challenging the lynching of her husband, a mob brutally beat Mary Turner, hung her upside down from a tree, poured gasoline all over her and roasted her alive. As she smoldered, a white man knifed opened her womb like you would a deer and her baby, just days from birth, fell to the ground. After letting out a cry, the mob of white men stomped Mary's baby to death. Then the sheriff of Valdosta, GA decided justice had been served and sent the men home.  It was dinner time and their wives would have supper on the table. In 1918 in the American South, heinous, unthinkable acts were routinely carried out on somebody else's babies.  

Just a day after giving birth to her daughter, Ester Edelbaum still in her pink nightgown found herself in the back of a truck after being rounded up from the maternity ward by Nazis. Scared and in shock, she watched her day-old daughter thrown from the 2nd floor window and caught on the end of a Nazi bayonet. Another young Nazi, who witnessed the execution of Ester's daughter, thought it would be fun to see who could catch the most babies as they were thrown from the window. Some babies were missed and fell to their death on the ground. Others were caught on the pointed end of the Nazi's bayonets. The game was stopped by the commander, not because it was cruel and heartless to take the lives of helpless Jewish newborns, but because the game was soiling their uniforms. In Nazi Germany in 1941, heinous, unthinkable acts were routinely carried out on somebody else's babies.  

When my youngest asked recently, after headlines mentioned bomb threats and desecrated cemeteries, why would anyone hate Jews? I had no good answer to give that explained hate and the heinous, unthinkable acts it often feeds. How do you explain to your eight year old, they hate you because you are considered somebody else's baby? 

 

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